Systems of North American Witchcraft and Sorcery

By Deward E. Walker Jr. | Go to book overview
cally used as a countermeasure. There is a most evil game utilized exclusively in cases of witchcraft known also as "the bowl game," but played with different counters and necessitating the thrusting of sticks into a pot of soil (see Shimony 1961a: 288).
9. Non-directed charms are to be mentioned particularly in this category. Although one cannot focus on a particular aggressor, misfortune and death strike one's family. No amount of ritual exertion is considered superfluous in "pleasing" the charm. One might well postulate that the culture has provided a very effective device whereby an individual who feels guilty about neglecting his ritual or traditional duties can perform them again without loss of face. "Finding a charm on his place" which has "bothered" the family is an absolute demand to engage in at least some ritual activity.

REFERENCES CITED
Chafe Wallace L. 1963 Handbook of the Seneca language. Albany, New York State Museum and Science Service, Bulletin No. 388.
Deardorff Merle H. 1951 "The religion of Handsome Lake: its origin and development". In Symposium on local diversity in Iroquois culture. W. N. Fenton, ed. Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin No. 149. Washington, Smithsonian Institution.
Evans-Pritchard E. E. 1937 Witchcraft, oracles and magic among the Azande. Oxford, Clarendon Press.
Fenton William N. 1951 "The concept of locality and the program of Iroquois research". In Symposium on local diversity in Iroquois culture. W. N. Fenton, ed. Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin No. 149. Washington, Smithsonian Institution. 1965 The Iroquois confederacy in the twentieth century: a case study of the theory of Lewis H. Morgan in "Ancient Society." Ethnology 4:251- 265.
Morgan Lewis H. 1954 League of the Ho-Do-No Sau-Nee or Iroquois, Vols. 1-2. New Haven, Human Relations Area Files.
Parker Arthur C. 1913 The code of Handsome Lake, the Seneca prophet. Albany, New York State Museum Bulletin No. 163.
Randle Martha Champion 1953 The Waugh collection of Iroquois folktales. Philadelphia, Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 97:611-633.
Shimony Annemarie A. 1961a Conservatism among the Iroquois at the Six Nations Reserve. Yale University Publications in Anthropology, No. 65, New Haven, Dept. of Anthropology, Yale University. 1961b The Iroquois fortune tellers and their conservative influence. In Symposium on Cherokee and Iroquois culture. W. N. Fenton and John Gulick , eds. Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin No. 180. Washington, Smithsonian Institution.
Speck F. 1949 Midwinter rites of the Cayuga Long House. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press.

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Systems of North American Witchcraft and Sorcery
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Contents vi
  • Introduction 1
  • References Cited 9
  • Chapter I - Western Apache Witchcraft 11
  • Chapter II - Pueblo Witchcraft and Medicine 37
  • References Cited 70
  • Chapter III - Witchcraft in Tecospa and Tepepan 73
  • References Cited 92
  • Chapter IV - Two Views of Obeah and Witchcraft 95
  • References Cited 108
  • Notes 122
  • References Cited 123
  • Chapter V - Sorcery in Santiago El Palmar 125
  • References Cited 145
  • Chapter VI - Introduction Skokomish Sorcery, Ethics, and Society 147
  • Appendix 5 166
  • References Cited 181
  • References Cited 182
  • Chapter VII - Menomini Witchcraft 183
  • Chapter VIII - Witchcraft AMong Kaska Indians 221
  • References Cited 235
  • Chapter IX - Iroquois Witchcraft at Six Nations 239
  • References Cited 262
  • References Cited 264
  • Chapter X - Sorcery Among the Nez Perces 267
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