Law and Business of the Sports Industries: Common Issues in Amateur and Professional Sports - Vol. 2

By Robert C. Berry; Glenn M. Wong | Go to book overview

PREFACE
The changes in this edition, reflecting what has happened in sports during the past several years, are significant. By way of illustrating that fact we might consider the following instances:
1. NCAA v. Tarkanian (109 S.Ct. 454 [ 1988] -- The U.S. Supreme Court found the NCAA was not a state actor and therefore not subject to constitutional limitations. This followed a complaint by Jerry Tarkanian, men's basketball coach at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, alleging that his due process rights had been violated following the NCAA's request for Tarkanian's suspension after an investigation into NCAA rule violations committed by the coach.
2. Civil Rights Restoration Act -- The passage of the Civil Rights Restoration Act by Congress in 1988 helped to restore the usage of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 as an avenue for female athletes, coaches and administrators alleging sex discrimination. Passage of the CRRA returned Title IX applicability to the "institutional approach" which mandated that athletic departments within institutions that received federal financial assistance are subject to Title IX legislation.
3. Ross v. Creighton University -- This highly publicized case involving educational malpractice allegations being made against Creighton University was decided in favor of the university. Ross was a basketball player who was recruited and played for Creighton University. Upon leaving Creighton, without a degree, Ross claimed the university was negligent when it recruited him because he was not academically prepared to attend the university. In addition, Ross claimed the university failed to provide him with adequate tutoring and other support once he was enrolled. The case was decided in favor of Creighton University with the court stating that in education, the ultimate responsibility for success remains always with the student.
4. Proposition 48 and Proposition 26 -- Proposition 48 which was passed in 1983 (and went into effect in 1986) required an incoming freshman student-athlete to achieve both a 2.0 GPA in at least 11 academic core courses and achieve at least a 700 on the SAT test or a 15 on the ACT. At the 1992 NCAA Convention, these academic standards were changed further with the passing of stricter requirements. These standards will take effect in 1995 and include requirements that an athlete possess a 2.5 GPA and 700 SAT or 17 ACT or a 2.0 GPA with a 900 SAT or 21 ACT. Appropriate SAT and ACT scores for GPA's between 2.0 and 2.5 are calculated according to a sliding scale. A partial

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Law and Business of the Sports Industries: Common Issues in Amateur and Professional Sports - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Amateur Athletic Associations 33
  • Chapter 3 - The Amateur Athlete 119
  • Chapter 4 - Sex Discrimination in Athletics 245
  • Chapter 5 - Contract Law 329
  • Appendix 344
  • Chapter 6 - Legal Principles in Tort Law 397
  • Chapter 7 - Application of Tort Law 447
  • Chapter 8 - Drug Testing 567
  • Chapter 9 - Trademark Law 619
  • Chapter - Criminal Law and Its Relationship to Sports 679
  • Chapter 11 - Sports and the Media 713
  • Chapter 12 - Antitrust and Tax Law 775
  • Glossary 799
  • Table of Cases 809
  • Index 839
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 848

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.