Arthur James Balfour, First Earl of Balfour, K.G., O.M., F.R.S., Etc - Vol. 1

By Blanche E. C. Dugdale | Go to book overview

Chapter XV THE EDUCATION ACT OF 1902

The drafting of the Bill. Balfour and Morant. Cabinet tries to avoid rate aid for Voluntary Schools. Lord Salisbury and Mr. Chamberlain against rate aid. Balfour insists. Balfour explains his policy in Manchester. The "Kenyon-Slaney" Amendment puts control of religious teaching in hands of whole body of School Managers. Wrath of Church Party. Balfour's reply to Dr. Clifford. Passive resistance to the Act.

THE political history of the Act, which became the foundation of the Education system in England and Wales, extends over some four years, and the actual passing of the Bill through Parliament is only one episode of a long campaign. Balfour's name will always be associated with this great piece of legislation. His was throughout the determining mind in framing its policy and subsequently in the tactics that carried it through the House of Commons.

The story begins in 1901, and falls into three periods of struggle-- in Cabinet, in Parliament, and in the constituencies--ending with the General Election of 1906.

Fresh proofs of the necessity for a Bill had been given by the judgment of the Court of Appeal on the Cockerton case, which denied to the School Boards the power of using rates for any purpose beyond the strictly limited requirements of Elementary Education. Determined that the fiasco of the Bill of 1896 should not be repeated, Balfour gave his whole mind to the subject as soon as his September golfing holiday of 1901 was over. During October and November discussions were held at Whittingehame with people concerned, and by the time that the Cabinet, in December, began to estimate the obstacles to acceptable legislation along any lines, Balfour had more or less made up his mind as to how the difficulties should be faced. He was still only First Lord of the Treasury, and so without any particular locus standi in the Board of Education, which was,

-236-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Arthur James Balfour, First Earl of Balfour, K.G., O.M., F.R.S., Etc - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 338

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.