Bernard Baruch, Park Bench Statesman

By Carter Field | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE

IT was election night in Camden, South Carolina. Down the dusty street came a mob--flourishing weapons, menacing, capable of almost anything. It was composed of Negroes ordinarily kindly, good-humored, obliging, but at the moment inflamed by carpetbag oratory and crazed by free whisky dispensed by scalawag politicians.

In a small house that the mob was nearing, a mother looked anxiously at her four young sons, whose father was away on an emergency sick call.

Grimly she opened the cupboard door, took out two ancient single-barreled shotguns, which she handed to the two oldest boys, and led the boys to the second-floor porch.

"Let them see the guns," she said, "but don't shoot unless I say so."

There was scarcely a Negro in the crowd who did not know and like Miss Belle, the mother. There were few of them whom the doctor, her husband, had not taken care of when sick or who had not been furnished with food and medicine when in need. Many of them knew the little boys, now standing guard so brave without and so fearful within. Some of the Negroes even knew that the boys were pretty fair shots for their age. They had hunted wild turkeys and ducks and quail with them.

Maybe the mob would never have bothered the house, anyway. Maybe the guns prevented trouble. But had those guns

-1-

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Bernard Baruch, Park Bench Statesman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Illustrations v
  • Chapter One 1
  • Chapter Two 13
  • Chapter Three 21
  • Chapter Four 28
  • Chapter Five 37
  • Chapter Six 45
  • Chapter Seven 54
  • Chapter Eight 63
  • Chapter Nine 70
  • Chapter Ten 79
  • Chapter Eleven 89
  • Chapter Twelve 98
  • Chapter Thirteen 108
  • Chapter Fourteen 117
  • Chapter Fifteen 126
  • Chapter Sixteen 134
  • Chapter Seventeen 145
  • Chapter Eighteen 158
  • Chapter Nineteen 169
  • Chapter Twenty 181
  • Chapter Twenty-One 195
  • Chapter . . . Twenty-Two 207
  • Chapter Twenty-Three 218
  • Chapter Twenty-Four 228
  • Chapter Twenty-Five 238
  • Chapter Twenty-Six 250
  • Chapter Twenty-Seven 262
  • Chapter Twenty-Eight 272
  • Chapter Twenty-Nine 284
  • Chapter Thirty 297
  • Chapter Thirty-One 303
  • Index 311
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