Bernard Baruch, Park Bench Statesman

By Carter Field | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THIRTEEN

UNDER this curious cloak of anonymity Baruch exercised a very unusual type of political power in those early Wilson days. He was cultivated by most of the Wilson lieutenants, who speedily found out that he could do more for them in certain quarters than they could do either directly or by appealing to Wilson.

This power of Baruch was utterly unsuspected on the outside and, quite possibly, by President Wilson, yet the fact that Baruch was important to a number of the insiders was due to a very definite Wilson policy. The President would permit the men he trusted, once he assigned them to particular jobs, to run those jobs with very little interference from the White House.

Thus if Y was running a job, and had Wilson's confidence, and X wanted to get a man appointed under him or to induce Y to do something different from what he was obviously about to do, there was little use for X to appeal to Wilson. This was true even if X were sure that Wilson would agree as to the merits of his proposed candidate or suggested policy. In most instances Wilson would not even listen, once he realized what X was after.

"That is entirely up to Y," he would say. "I will not interfere with his organization or policies so long as he is doing a good job."

This does not mean that Wilson took no interest in seeing what happened on that particular job. He took an almost schoolmasterly interest in watching his appointees to important positions.

-108-

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Bernard Baruch, Park Bench Statesman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Illustrations v
  • Chapter One 1
  • Chapter Two 13
  • Chapter Three 21
  • Chapter Four 28
  • Chapter Five 37
  • Chapter Six 45
  • Chapter Seven 54
  • Chapter Eight 63
  • Chapter Nine 70
  • Chapter Ten 79
  • Chapter Eleven 89
  • Chapter Twelve 98
  • Chapter Thirteen 108
  • Chapter Fourteen 117
  • Chapter Fifteen 126
  • Chapter Sixteen 134
  • Chapter Seventeen 145
  • Chapter Eighteen 158
  • Chapter Nineteen 169
  • Chapter Twenty 181
  • Chapter Twenty-One 195
  • Chapter . . . Twenty-Two 207
  • Chapter Twenty-Three 218
  • Chapter Twenty-Four 228
  • Chapter Twenty-Five 238
  • Chapter Twenty-Six 250
  • Chapter Twenty-Seven 262
  • Chapter Twenty-Eight 272
  • Chapter Twenty-Nine 284
  • Chapter Thirty 297
  • Chapter Thirty-One 303
  • Index 311
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