Bernard Baruch, Park Bench Statesman

By Carter Field | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOURTEEN

BARUCH had been sowing seed in an entirely new type of political garden since Wilson entered the White House. This was the development of strong personal friendships with important personalities in the Democratic Party, with most of the beds carefully spaded and fertilized for the cultivation of senators.

It was not so deliberate as this sounds. In fact I am fairly sure that it was not deliberate at all. The best evidence of this is that he seldom bothered with any Democratic figure, even a senator, who did not appeal to him personally, and he never bothered to ingratiate himself with anyone, senator or otherwise, who in his opinion had been unfair or personally critical of Woodrow Wilson. Baruch liked people easily, however, so these restrictions did not make the number small.

It should be noted here that if Baruch had entertained some thought of political accomplishment, when he embarked on this course of building unusual political influence, he would have been much more catholic in his application of the tenets of Dale Carnegie. He has always rather prided himself on his ability to bring hostile persons together, make them forget their animosities, at least for the time being, and work together on the immediate task. He discovered this ability in his college days and applied it frequently in Wall Street and in his development of natural resources, long before he started his political garden.

-117-

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Bernard Baruch, Park Bench Statesman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Illustrations v
  • Chapter One 1
  • Chapter Two 13
  • Chapter Three 21
  • Chapter Four 28
  • Chapter Five 37
  • Chapter Six 45
  • Chapter Seven 54
  • Chapter Eight 63
  • Chapter Nine 70
  • Chapter Ten 79
  • Chapter Eleven 89
  • Chapter Twelve 98
  • Chapter Thirteen 108
  • Chapter Fourteen 117
  • Chapter Fifteen 126
  • Chapter Sixteen 134
  • Chapter Seventeen 145
  • Chapter Eighteen 158
  • Chapter Nineteen 169
  • Chapter Twenty 181
  • Chapter Twenty-One 195
  • Chapter . . . Twenty-Two 207
  • Chapter Twenty-Three 218
  • Chapter Twenty-Four 228
  • Chapter Twenty-Five 238
  • Chapter Twenty-Six 250
  • Chapter Twenty-Seven 262
  • Chapter Twenty-Eight 272
  • Chapter Twenty-Nine 284
  • Chapter Thirty 297
  • Chapter Thirty-One 303
  • Index 311
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