An Affair of State: The Investigation, Impeachment, and Trial of President Clinton

By Richard A. Posner | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8 The Balance Sheet

The public life of the nation in 1998 and the first six weeks of 1999 was dominated by President Clinton's struggle to retain his office. The struggle was deeply and not merely pruriently or dramatically interesting, though it was high drama--Wagnerian in intensity and protraction, with wonderful actors, the Clintons, in the lead roles, a supporting cast of hundreds, dramatic revelations aplenty (the tapes, the dress, the sex lives of Republican Congressmen), a splendid libretto by Kenneth Starr,1 a Greek chorus of television commentators; plus hapless walk-ons, clandestine comings and goings, betrayals, suspense, reversals of fortune, hints of violence (supplied by the Clinton haters), a May-December romance as it might be depicted by an Updike or a Cheever, a doubling and redoubling of plot, a Bildungsroman,2 even allegorical commentary (the movies Primary Colors and Wag the Dog) and a touch of comic opera ( Chief Justice Rehnquist's costume out of Iolanthe). It was the ultimate Washington novel, the supreme and never to be equaled expression of the genre and the proof that truth is indeed stranger than fiction.

But putting its entertainment value to one side, are we better or worse off for the experience? It is too soon to tell; it is especially premature to say that we are worse off.

____________________
1
On the Starr Report as (almost) "a novel in the classic tradition," or a "moralizing narrative," see Adam Gopnik, "American Studies," New Yorker, Sept. 28, 1998, p. 39.
2
have in mind the metamorphosis of Monica Lewinsky from the giddy pizza-bearing sextern of November 1995 to the poised and articulate young woman whose videotaped testimony was shown to the Senate and the world on February 6, 1999.

-262-

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An Affair of State: The Investigation, Impeachment, and Trial of President Clinton
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Dramatis Personae vii
  • Chronology ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 the President's Conduct 16
  • Chapter 2 Prosecution and Defense 59
  • Chapter 3 the History, Scope, and Form of Impeachment 95
  • Chapter 4 Morality, Private and Public 133
  • Chapter 5 Should President Clinton Have Been Impeached, and If Impeached Convicted? 170
  • Chapter 6 the Kulturkampf 199
  • Chapter 7 Lessons for the Future 217
  • Chapter 8 the Balance Sheet 262
  • Acknowledgments 267
  • Index 269
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