FOREWORD AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
In a press release for the retrospective exhibition of collages held at The Museum of Modern Art in 1948 Margaret Miller, director of the exhibition, wrote that "collage cannot be defined adequately as merely a technique of cutting and pasting, for its significance lies not in its technical eccentricity but in its relevance to two basic questions which have been raised by twentieth-century art: the nature of reality and the nature of painting itself. Collage has been the means through which the artist incorporates reality in the picture without imitating it." Even though the unexpected extension of the collage method that has occurred during the last few years could not have been predicted at that time, Miss Miller's comments nevertheless point out specifically its importance for contemporary art. Yet, valuable as the term "collage" remains today, the diverse works which comprise this book and exhibition call for a designation not only more embracing, but also more indicative of the mediating principles which they demonstrate.Save for a few calculated examples, the physical characteristics that these collages, objects, and constructions have in common can be stated simply:
1. They are predominantly assembled rather than painted, drawn, modeled, or carved.
2. Entirely or in part, their constituent elements are preformed natural or manufactured materials, objects, or fragments not intended as art materials.

If it were not typographically awkward, the title of this book could have been "The Art, Non-Art, and Anti-Art of Assemblage," for, though the painterly collages of Esteban Vicente or the welded constructions of David Smith and Ettore Colla approach painting or sculpture, and though a majority of the works included are unquestionably works of art, others were fabricated expressly to dispel an aura of authority, profundity, and sanctity. Some, such as the wittily speculative objects of Man Ray, were "designed to amuse, annoy, bewilder, mystify, inspire reflection but not arouse admiration for any technical excellence usually sought or valued in objects classified as works of art."1 There are even some pieces here that cannot be called "art" at all in the accepted sense of that term. They are "readymade" assemblages: portions removed from the everyday environment without alteration, and presented "on a plane apparently not suited to them"2 for a special kind of examination.

Neither the exhibition nor the book is a detailed survey, either of the technique of collage and its expanded forms, or of the movements within which these innovations occurred. If anything has been surveyed, it is the metaphysics of assemblage rather than its history. To the degree that both the text and the exhibition are -- inevitably, I feel -- historical, they attempt to follow one among the many threads that lead through the labyrinth of twentieth-century styles. The walls of its compartments are not immovable; each added viewpoint changes their arrangement.

To bring together works, some of them controversial, by little-known as well as well-known and famous artists entails many evaluations, reconsiderations and anguishing exclusions. I owe a special debt of gratitude, therefore, to those who, in the United States and in Europe, gave assistance, information, and suggestions that

-6-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Art of Assemblage
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword and Acknowledgments 6
  • Introduction 9
  • The Liberation of Words 13
  • The Liberation of Objects 21
  • The Collage Environment 72
  • The Realism and Poetry of Assemblage 81
  • Attitudes and Issues 87
  • Notes 150
  • Photograph Credits 152
  • Catalogue of the Exhibition 153
  • Assemblange: A Working Bibliography 166
  • Index 174
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 178

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.