Children's Literature in China: From Lu Xun to Mao Zedong

By Mary Ann Farquhar | Go to book overview

works. Film in the period of this study also adapted its themes from written works and its styles from opera. It was a 'word- bound' form. 4 The Communists were able to control production of this literature and art, and who read or saw it, because they controlled the infrastructure.

In the post- Mao period, 'technologicalized visuality' 5 has transformed what Chinese children like to read and watch. Chinese cities and increasingly the Chinese countryside are wired for sound and images. At the same time, much of the communications network has been commercialized, global programs are more and more accessible, and children have become active consumers with their own preferences, not merely a passive audience to be fed a prescribed diet. Technological revolution has changed the children's literature industry at the end of the twentieth century, including favored forms and genres, just as commercialized publishing changed this literature at the beginning of the century. Detailed study of post-Mao children's literature and art will inevitably need to consider the radical changes wrought by global technologies and visual communication.


Conclusion

Dramatic change in the political and technological environments inside China does not dilute the significance of the canon of children's literature formed in the period from Lu Xun to Mao Zedong. The works of canonical writers are constantly reprinted and recirculated. A technologized media adapts old works into new forms, a strategy long recognized by Chinese Marxists. The canon of children's literature is therefore further disseminated just as it is institutionalized in its written and audio-visual forms as part of the post-Mao education system. Children's literature is cumulative and the post-Mao canon includes the corpus of major works published in the period between Lu Xun's first translations in 1903 and Mao Zedong's death in 1976.

Children's literature in this period was about great dreams of a future China. It was constructed in the hope of recreating the

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Children's Literature in China: From Lu Xun to Mao Zedong
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Studies on Modern China ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 10
  • 1 - The Historical Background 13
  • Conclusion 36
  • Notes 37
  • 2 - Lu Xun and the World of Children 41
  • Conclusion 84
  • Notes 86
  • 3 - A New Children's Literature 91
  • Conclusion 138
  • Notes 139
  • 4 - Revolutionary Children's Literature 143
  • Conclusion 185
  • Notes 187
  • 5 - Comic Books and Popularization 191
  • Conclusion 242
  • Notes 244
  • 6 - Children's Literature in the People's Republic of China 249
  • Conclusion 293
  • Notes 295
  • 7 - The Post-Mao Canon 299
  • Conclusion 305
  • Notes 306
  • Bibliography 307
  • Index 325
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