The Rape of Poland: Pattern of Soviet Aggression

By Stanislaw Mikolajczyk | Go to book overview

Chapter Fifteen SOVIETIZATION
We resign from the cabinet but remain in parliament The new constitution is Communist Communists get key posts The standard of living goes down The economy is nationalized . . . and pauperized

THE three Polish Peasant Party members of the old cabinet resigned on the day following the government's release of the election returns. I called on Bierut immediately, however, to assure him that our party--though now plainly faced with annihilation--would continue to fight for a free nation.

I officially informed him that we had resigned in protest against the blatantly fixed elections and promised that, so long as we lasted, we would bring to bear every legal means of defeating the spurious new parliament. I stressed especially the fact that we did not consider the new parliament had any authority to change the basic laws of the land.

In the name of the actual majority that had given us its votes of confidence; I called upon Bierut to release all persons illegally arrested before the election, to reprieve all those under death sentence, and to return to Poland the 40,000

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