The Rape of Poland: Pattern of Soviet Aggression

By Stanislaw Mikolajczyk | Go to book overview

APPENDIX

1. The Polish-Soviet Agreement signed in London on July 30, 1941, provided:
1. The Government of the U.S.S.R. recognizes that the Soviet-German treaties of 1939 relative to territorial changes in Poland have lost their validity. The Government of the Republic of Poland declares that Poland is not bound by any agreement with any third State directed against the U.S.S.R.
2. Diplomatic relations will be restored between the two Governments upon the signature of this agreement, and an exchange of Ambassadors will follow immediately.
3. The two Governments mutually undertake to render one another aid and support of all kinds in the present war against Hitlerite Germany.
4. The Government of the U.S.S.R. expresses its consent to the formation on the territory of the U.S.S.R. of a Polish army under a Commander appointed by the Polish Government in agreement with the Soviet Government. The Polish army on the territory of the U.S.S.R. will be subordinated in operational matters to the Supreme Command of the U.S.S.R., on which there will be a representative of the Polish Army. All details as to command, organization and employment of the force will be settled in subsequent agreement.
5. This Agreement will come into force immediately upon its signature and without ratification.

Protocol.--As soon as diplomatic relations are re-established the Government of the U.S.S.R. will grant amnesty to all Polish citizens who are at present deprived of their freedom on the territory of the U.S.S.R., either as prisoners of war or on other adequate grounds.

Secret Protocol.--1. All kinds of claims of public as well as of private character will be considered in further negotiations between both Governments.

2. This protocol comes into force simultaneously with the pact of 30th July 1941.

London, 30th July, 1941 Władysław Sikorski

I. Maisky


2. Ambassador Kot's note of October 13, 1941, to Vishinsky about Polish prisoners in Russia:

During my conversation on October 7, Mr. Commissar, I quoted figures relating to Polish citizens who were still detained in large numbers in camps and mentioned the fact that certain categories among them had been transferred to very remote Northern regions. In spite of repeated Polish requests and the assurance given on behalf of the Soviets, this Embassy has not as yet received the list of localities nor the exact numbers of Polish citizens released.

-259-

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