The Early Stuarts, 1603-1660

By Godfrey Davies | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

THE keynote of the seventeenth century was revolt against authority. Modern times as distinct from the middle ages had begun under the Tudors and were now developing rapidly. The surviving elements of medievalism were being viewed with increasing scepticism.

The tide of discontent in England, which began to come in under James I ( 1603-25), swelled during the reign of Charles I ( 1625-49) and reached its high-water mark at the king's execution. For eleven uneasy years England was a republic, but as the commonwealth ( 1649-53) gave way to the protectorate ( 1653-9) the tide turned, became more conservative, and after a year's ebbing and flowing restored the monarchy. The return of the Stuarts did not entail setting back the clock to the status quo of 1603, or even 1642. The legislature might affect to ignore all that had been accomplished during 1642-60, but the minds of men had received an ineffaceable impression that can be traced in many directions.

In the realm of thought there was a definite break with the past. Scholasticism, after more than three centuries of dominance, was at length challenged by a new philosophy. The desire to learn the secrets of nature and to banish fear of the unknown was in conflict with the cosmic interpretation that had been accepted since the thirteenth century. The age of experiment was treading upon the heels of the age of dogma.

In political thought the sixteenth-century conception of the monarch as the saviour of society and the theory of the divine right of kings (which reached its highest exaltation under the early Stuarts) were violently assailed, and substitutes of almost infinite variety were offered by theorists. Many of the democratic, and not a few of the socialistic, doctrines that are commonly regarded as modern, or at least of the eighteenth century, were set forth in the seventeenth century. The greatest contribution then made to political theory, Hobbes Leviathan, was written for all time, but even in a theocratic age its daring insistence upon a state of nature, a covenant as the basis of society, and the imperative need for a sovereign power in the state exercised a real if rather imperceptible influence.

In religion the Reformation had already rent in twain the

-xxi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Early Stuarts, 1603-1660
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 472

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.