Tobacco Control Laws: Implementation and Enforcement

By Peter D. Jacobson; Jeffrey Wasserman | Go to book overview

Appendix E
NEW YORK CASE STUDY

BACKGROUND

Summary of Political Evolution

In 1989, New York State enacted one of the nation's strongest statewide clean indoor air acts. The Clean Indoor Air Act (CIAA) was passed after several local jurisdictions had enacted stringent clean indoor air regulations. Subsequently, tobacco control advocates were successful in enacting strong vending machine restrictions in New York City and strong local clean indoor air ordinances in New York City and other downstate localities. In response, the tobacco industry has been lobbying to enact statewide preemption of local ordinances.

Update on Legislative Activity . At the state level, the legislature enacted the Adolescent Tobacco Use Prevention Act (ATUPA) in 1992, with compliance responsibilities shared by the Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH). The legislature also enacted the Tobacco-Free Schools legislation in 1994, known colloquially as the Pro Kids Act, which prohibits the sale of single cigarettes ("loosies") and the use of tobacco on school grounds or other youth-related facilities.

At the local level, several stringent CIAA ordinances were enacted in 1994, 1995, and 1996 in New York City, and Nassau, Suffolk, and Westchester Counties. Similar measures are under consideration in

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Tobacco Control Laws: Implementation and Enforcement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables ix
  • Summary xi
  • Acknowledgments xxiii
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Overview of the Case Studies 23
  • Chapter Three - Results 49
  • Chapter Four - Discussion 79
  • Appendix A - Texas Case Study 97
  • Appendix B - Arizona Case Study 109
  • Appendix C - Minnesota Case Study 121
  • Appendix D - California Case Study 133
  • Appendix E - New York Case Study 145
  • Appendix F - Illinois Case Study 163
  • Appendix G - Florida Case Study 177
  • Appendix H - Interview Guide for Assessing the Implementation of Tobacco Control Laws 189
  • Bibliography 195
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