The Mycenaean Age: A Study of the Monuments and Culture of Pre-Homeric Greece

By Chrestos Tsountas; J. Irving Manatt | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THIS work is at once old and new, and I cannot fairly launch it afresh without some account of its origin.

Ten years ago a young Greek archeologist, Chrestos Tsountas, was commissioned by his government to continue the exploration of Mycenae which Dr. Schliemann had begun. It could hardly have seemed an inspiring task to glean after the greet explorer who had dazzled the world with the treasure of the Royal Tombs; but it was a task that demanded thorough training, keen insight, and unlimited patience. Armed with these qualities, Dr. Tsountas went to work and a busy decade has passed without seeing the end of it. Meantime he has restored to us the Palace of the Pelopid kings; he has unearthed and studied the humbler abodes of their retainers and menials; he has traced the fortress walls through all the stages of construction gad extension, and discovered the secret waterway which enabled the citadel to hold out against a siege; in short, he has laid bare the old Achaean capitol in its great enduring features, and has thus revealed to modern eyes the typical Acropolis of the Heroic Age. More than that, he has explored the lower town and particularly the clan or village cemeteries, each composed of a group of rock-hewn tombs whose disposition and contents have shed new light on the civic, and religious life of the time. While patiently pursuing this great task, he has now and again

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