The Mycenaean Age: A Study of the Monuments and Culture of Pre-Homeric Greece

By Chrestos Tsountas; J. Irving Manatt | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III THE PALACE

THUS far we have recovered in various stages of preservation at least three Mycenaean palaces, viz., at Tiryns, Mycenae, and Gha (or Arne), not to mention the scanty remains on the Athenian acropolis or the palace of the second cry on the hill of Hissarlik ( Troy) which is now known to be indefinitely earlier than the Mycenaean age. Of all these the palace at Tiryns is far the best preserved and most certain in its ground-plan. We shall therefore study it in detail before proceeding to the palace at Mycenae, with which Time and the destroyer have dealt more ruthlessly.1

The palace of Tiryns, brought to light by Dr. Schliemann in 1884, occupies the highest of the three plateaus composing the acropolis. To reach it you ascend the great ramp under the eastern wall, pass through the open entrance, traverse the high-walled approach and enter the inner fortress by the great gate (Θ). From this the road leads up to a large court, closed on the east by the circuit wall which here bears a covered colonnade opening on the interior of the fortress. Over against this colonnade is the outer gate of the palace (Η). It is a spacious and stately portal -- about 46 feet wide -- composed of a

Outer Gateway

____________________
1
Of other palaces we shall have occasion to speak only by the way, but, that recently discovered on the island of Goulas (or Gha) in Lake Copaïs will claim more careful notice (Appendix B).

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