John Paul Jones: Man of Action

By Phillips Russell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XX
More Treachery

And now the storm-blast came, and he Was tyrannous and strong: He struck with his o'ertaking wings And chased us south along.


I

JONES shaped his course northwest across the mouth of the English Channel toward the western shore of Ireland. "Unfortunately," says his Journal, written in the third person, there was neither secrecy nor subordination. Captain Jones saw his danger, but his reputation being at stake, he put all to the hazard.

Trouble began to occur at once. Captain de Roberdeau informed Jones that he could not endure the presence of Landais; but he remained in the squadron long enough to assist in the capture of a Dutch ship which had been taken as a prize by the British. De Roberdeau tried to send her as his own prize to Ostend, but being overruled by Jones, he took what he needed out of the ship during the night, gradually dropped behind the squadron, and finally disappeared with the splendid ship which the lady Freemasons of France had so trustfully contributed to Jones's expedition.

The squadron, now reduced to six sail, took a brigantine. Two days later, off Cape Clear, Ireland, while another ship was being overtaken, Jones ordered some of his British sailors to get into a barge and tow the Bon Homme Richard so as to avoid the rocks called the Shallocks. While Jones was busy watching the boats pursuing the new prize, the Englishmen cut the tow

-144-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
John Paul Jones: Man of Action
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.