The Work of Living Art: A Theory of the Theatre

By Adolphe Appia; Barnard Hewitt et al. | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

AS THE SECOND VOLUME in the American Educational Theatre Association--University of Miami Press Books of the Theatre Series, we are pleased to present in English for the first time Adolphe Appia The Work of Living Art, for, although it is not so well known as his La Mise en Scène du Drame Wagnèrien or his La Musique et la Mise en Scène (published in German translation as Die Musik und die Inscenierung), it was written nearly twenty years later and is a much more complete statement of Appia's mature theory of theatre art. He called it his most significant work, the work which expressed his ideas most completely.1

The brief essay "Man is the Measure of All Things" expounds essentially the same aesthetic without the detailed support which Appia presents in The Work of Living Art.

We are indebted to the Fondation Adolphe Appia, Geneva, Switzerland, for permission to publish these two works. We are grateful also to Edmund Stadler and the Schweizerische Theatersammlung, Berne, Switzerland, for the portrait photograph of Adolphe Appia by Thérèse Appia which precedes the section of designs in this volume.

The editor and the translators are grateful to Walther R. Volbach of Texas Christian University, who, acting for both the Fondation Adolphe Appia and the American Educational Theatre Association, read the translations and made many helpful suggestions. Mr. Volbach, who is translating Appia's essays, also contributed the note on page 107.

The late A. M. Drummond of Cornell University assisted greatly in the early stages of the translation of The Work ofLiving Art

____________________
1
"Curriculum Vitae d'Adolphe Appia," written by himself in 1927, unpublished manuscript in the possession of the Fondation Adolphe Appia.

-ix-

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The Work of Living Art: A Theory of the Theatre
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Books of the Theatre Series iii
  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Adolphe Appia and "The Work of Living Art" xi
  • Preface 1
  • 1. the Elements 3
  • 2. Living Time 19
  • 3. Living Space 25
  • 4. Living Color 31
  • 5. Organic Unity 38
  • 6. Collaboration 59
  • 7. the Great Unknown and the Experience of Beauty 68
  • 8. Bearers of the Flame 79
  • Designs 83
  • Adolphe Appia's "Man is the Measure of All Things" (protagoras) 123
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