The Work of Living Art: A Theory of the Theatre

By Adolphe Appia; Barnard Hewitt et al. | Go to book overview

8. BEARERS OF THE FLAME

Parmi la foule sans lumière
qui suit le chemin gris des jours,

quelqu'un surgit soudain, frémissant, ébloui,
heureux!... Heureux!
Sûr d'un triomphe intérieur,
il bondit, brandissant sa joie
comme une torche!

Son ivresse palpite et brûle dans sa main
comme une flamme
qui le vent froisse
et déroule!
Et la lumière qu'il brandit
éclaire les visages proches
de la foule...
Elle se propage et grandit.
Et, plus leur ivresse rayonne
et gagne, et grise d'autres coeurs,

plus ces porteurs ardents d'invisibles flambeaux
ont des visages sûrs et beaux
que baigne le vent de leur course!
Puisque prodiguer son bonheur,
c'est en être plus riche encore.

Jacques Chenevière

HAVING EXTENDED my investigations to the farthest limits of the problem in hand, I fear that I may have overreached my rights as far as the reader is concerned. Yet such a procedure seemed indispensable to me; for if one intends to grasp an object firmly in his hand, he must first overreach that object. It is the same with an idea. Now that we have taken possession of living art, of the Idea it represents, and of the responsibilities it imposes, let us seek a clue to the practical usage it requires if it is to be of any benefit to our modern culture.

So far it has been only by accomplishing sacrifice after

-79-

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The Work of Living Art: A Theory of the Theatre
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Books of the Theatre Series iii
  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Adolphe Appia and "The Work of Living Art" xi
  • Preface 1
  • 1. the Elements 3
  • 2. Living Time 19
  • 3. Living Space 25
  • 4. Living Color 31
  • 5. Organic Unity 38
  • 6. Collaboration 59
  • 7. the Great Unknown and the Experience of Beauty 68
  • 8. Bearers of the Flame 79
  • Designs 83
  • Adolphe Appia's "Man is the Measure of All Things" (protagoras) 123
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