Sun Yat-Sen His Life and Its Meaning: A Critical Biography

By Lyon Sharman | Go to book overview

class, the working class, merchants, soldiers and politicians. This progress exceeded any one's expectation. Branches were also organized in the Straits Settlements and in America.

The Brotherhood began immediately publishing a newspaper for propaganda of its ideas, the People's Paper (Min Pao). On its editorial board were two able men, both still living: Hu Han-min, a member of the Nanking Government of 1928, and Wang Ching-wei, a peculiarly persuasive radical, who is frequently in and out of politics, and always has a following among the young students of China. Both were themselves young students in Japan at the time of the organization of the Brotherhood. To this day Wang Ching-wei is distinguished in the Kuomintang for the fluency with which he speaks Japanese. It was the effective writing in the Min Pao which made the revolutionary ideas known among the educated. The revolution had passed from the status of an organization among the lower classes to one commanding the support of intellectuals also. It had entered a new epoch.


DOCUMENTATION OF QUOTED PASSAGES
1
cific Commercial Advertiser ( Honolulu) Dec. 21, 1903, P. 3 .
2
Finch, Percival: "A Chinese Sage Speaks to the World," New, York Times Magazine, June 21, 1925.
Prefixed to the American edition of Cantlie and Jones: Sun Yat Sen and the Awak- ening of China ( New York, 1912).
4
San Francisco Examiner, April 7, 1904, P. 5.
9
Culin: The I Hing or "Patriotic Rising" ( Philadelphia, 1887) p. 2.
11
Sun Yat-sen: The True Solution of the Chinese Question, p. 5.
12
Sun Yat-sen: "My Reminiscences," The Strand Magazine ( London, March, 1912) Vol. 43, pp. 305, 306.
13
Sun Yat-sen: The True Solution ot the Chinese Question, p. 5.
16
Feature article on Sun Yat-sen, The Sun, New York, December 31, 1911.
17
Appendix B, P. 385.
18
Huie Kin: Reminiscences, p. 71.
19
Sun Yat-sen: San Min Chu I, trans. Price ( Shanghai, 1927) p. 15.
20
T'ang Leang-li: The inner History of the Chinese Revolution ( New York, 1930) p. 49.
21
Direct translation from the Chinese text found in Chung-shan Hsien-sheng Nien P'u under the- year 1905; also to be found in Sun Yat-sen's Collected Works.

SOURCES AND AUTHORITIES: See Appendix C, p. 398.

-100-

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