Sun Yat-Sen His Life and Its Meaning: A Critical Biography

By Lyon Sharman | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
Dream Chaos

I YUAN SHIH-KAI'S DYNASTIC DREAM

SUN YAT-SEN'S return to Chinese public life was due to the dramatic exit of his rival, Yuan Shih-kai, who, if he had planned it, could not have shaped his course of action more favorably for the reëntry of Sun Yat-sen to the political stage. That Yuan was the responsible head of the government while the Republic played out its little game of parliamentary futility relieved Sun Yat-sen of the odium of that failure. After Yuan Shih-kai had rid himself of the republicans and their tempestuous opposition tactics, it was clearly his responsibility to find for the Republic some modus vivendi. There were no longer either Kuomintang ministers or Kuomintang parliamentarians to hamper his policies; Kuomintang governors had been displaced; such army units as were formerly pro-Kuomintang had been shattered in the "Second Revolution." Sun Yat-sen, Huang Hsing and other prime movers toward a republic were suppressed or in exile.

For his own proper influence among the Chinese Yuan Shih-kai had become too popular with the foreign element in China, excepting the Japanese, who continued to hate him discreetly. It was foreign advice that speeded his undoing. He had in his service an American constitutional expert, Dr. F. J. Goodnow, a Professor at Johns Hopkins University, who -- because he was from the United States -- was supposed to have a dependable republican bias. It was he who drafted for Yuan Shih-kai a new constitutional basis -- a remarkable instrument known as the Constitutional Compact,

-202-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sun Yat-Sen His Life and Its Meaning: A Critical Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 420

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.