Sun Yat-Sen His Life and Its Meaning: A Critical Biography

By Lyon Sharman | Go to book overview

found for salaries and equipment. It goes without saying that the provision of these has been incalculably retarded by the chaotic conditions that have prevailed in Republican China. Yet in the face of such hard facts men have had the courage to attempt the education of adults. China's urgent need of an intelligent citizenship was to them a compelling motive, and the victory for a democratic written language seemed to open the way.

The very original plan upon which the mass education movement was projected had its suggestion in welfare work done among the Chinese labor battalions sent to Europe in the World War. The men of these units were for the most part so illiterate as to be unable to write letters home. An educational effort was organized for them on a simple plan which had been originally thought of as an aid to foreigners studying the Chinese language, that is, of ascertaining the words most frequently used and concentrating upon them as a reading vocabulary. That was the beginning of the "thousandcharacter" method now so vigorously promoted by Y. C. James Yen and his associates in mass education. A corollary has been the creation of books in the limited vocabulary. The motive appealed to has consistently been good citizenship. The diploma given for completion of the course confers on the graduate the quaint distinction of "literate citizen."


DOCUMENTATION OF QUOTED PASSAGES
1
The North China Herald ( Shanghai) Vol. 119, P. 399.
3
New York Herald Tribune, Feb. 10, 1929, Magazine section, p. 14.

SOURCES AND AUTHORITIES: See Appendix C, p. 401.

-226-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sun Yat-Sen His Life and Its Meaning: A Critical Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 420

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.