Sun Yat-Sen His Life and Its Meaning: A Critical Biography

By Lyon Sharman | Go to book overview

cry of the suffering millions, as men speak it and write it and read it, a spirit will be abroad in the land which will make itself felt and which in the end will shake Peking to its very foundations. 24

On April 2nd a semi-modernized Chinese funeral procession with certain military features escorted the heavy Chinese wooden casket to a beautiful temple in the Western Hills, Pi Yün Ssu, Azure Cloud Temple. There in a lofty chamber, accessible only by climbing many stairways, it rested for five years. During the disturbances of the Nationalist advance and during the dictatorship of Chang Tso-lin it awaited the arrival of the Kuomintang. Pilgrimages to the temporary resting place were for a while possible, but Chang Tso-lin quietly put a stop to them by ordering the chamber closed to the public. A much advertised metal coffin sent from Moscow arrived only tardily and proved to be as unsuitable as it was tasteless in design. It was shown to me and to other visitors lying discarded in a side corridor of the old temple, a temple splendidly oriental in its architecture and mellow with traditions that seemed rooted more deeply than the ancient white-barked pines of its courtyards. Sun Yat-sen could not have had a more beautiful final resting place, nor a more unfitting one. It was his wish that he should be buried at Nanking near the tomb of the first Ming Emperor. A project was shortly set afoot for the preparation of a suitably modernized mausoleum on Purple Mountain.


DOCUMENTATION OF QUOTED PASSAGES
1
Holcombe: The Chinese Revolution ( Cambridge, 1930), P. 359.
2
Translation by D. Willard Lyon, cf. The World Mission of Christianity [ The Report of the Jerusalem Conference of 1928] ( New York, 1928) Vol. I, p. 80.
3
From address on The FivePower Constitution, 1921, cf. Hsü: Sun Yat-sen, p. 108.
4
Sun Yat-sen: San Min Chu I, trans. Price (Shanghai, 1927) p. xii.
16
Sun Yatsen: San Min Chu I; Hsü: Sun Yat-sen, P. 384.
17
Sun Yat-sen: Outline of National Reconstruction; Holcombe: The Chinese Revolution, Appendix B, P.352.

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