Sun Yat-Sen His Life and Its Meaning: A Critical Biography

By Lyon Sharman | Go to book overview

APPENDIX B
Doctor Sun Yat Sen

SOME PERSONAL REMINISCENCES

BY CHARLES R. HAGER, M.D., OF HONGKONG

From The Missionary Herald. Boston, April, 1912, p. 171 f.

Dr. Hager went to South China as a missionary of the American Board in 1883, and for twenty-seven years he has resided in the city of Hongkong, conducting missionary work in that city and in country towns, chiefly in the province of Kwangtung. Two years since he was compelled by ill health to return to America, and is now residing in Claremont, Cal. Dr. Hager has been in close contact with the Chinese, especially those who have passed through Hongkong going to or from America. He has counseled and befriended thousands of them, both as a physician and a preacher of the gospel. -- THE EDITOR

So much has been written of this noted Chinese that has not always been in accordance with truth, that it has seemed best to me to record a few facts of my relation with him. It was in the autumn or possibly the winter months of 1883 that I first met him and judged him to be sixteen to eighteen years of age. He had returned to China from Honolulu, where he had spent a number of years in study, while his older brother was there engaged in business.

Of course, I could not help asking him whether he was a Christian, to which he replied that he believed the doctrine of Christ. "Then why do you not become baptized?""I am ready to be baptized at any time," he replied; and so after some months of waiting he received the ordinance in a Chinese schoolroom where a few Chinese were wont to meet with me every Sunday, about a stone's throw from the present American Board mission church in Hongkong.

It was a humble building in which the future provisional president

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