CHAPTER 13
Sunflowers Do Not Bloom in November

Landon spent almost all of the last four weeks of the 1936 campaign on the road. He again toured the middle west, and later he traveled from coast to coast in his search for votes. He prefaced his swing through the middle west by sharply criticizing the New Deal for having closed WPA records to public inspection, for saying that the veterans' bonus payments--most of which had been bonded--were no longer a public debt, and for claiming sole credit for the upturn in farm prices. Landon was also in a promising mood, giving his support to the long-obstructed St. Lawrence seaway project.1 It was obvious from the tone of these statements that he was worried. His only "victory" at this time came through Francis Townsend, the medicine man of the old-age-pension radicals, when he urged Californians who were unable to vote for Lemke, to support Landon.2

On the evening of October 8 the Sunflower Special left Topeka, traveling eastward. At Freeport, Illinois, the next morning, Landon revealed a new fire, saying there would be no slackening of the fight until the last ballot had been cast.

____________________
1
New York American, October 7, 1936; New York Times, October 8, 1936.
2
Topeka Capital, October 8, 1936. Townsend later asked people everywhere to vote for Landon--wherever Lemke was not on the ballot. Ibid., October 12, 1936.

-313-

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Landon of Kansas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Chapter 1 Beginnings 3
  • Chapter 2 Getting Down to Business 20
  • Chapter 3 State Chairman 47
  • Chapter 4 Oil and Politics Mix 67
  • Chapter 5 from Oil Rebel to Governor 91
  • Chapter 6 the Governor in Action 118
  • Chapter 7 Affairs of State 150
  • Chapter 8 a Second Term 181
  • Chapter 9 a Long Shot 208
  • Chapter 10 a Candidate for Sure 234
  • Chapter 11 the Early Campaign 262
  • Chapter 12 Full-Time Candidate 291
  • Chapter 13 Sunflowers Do Not Bloom in November 313
  • Chapter 14 from Under the Wreckage 340
  • Chapter 15 Titular Head 353
  • Chapter 16 a Practical Liberal? 381
  • Chapter 17 Days of World Crisis 407
  • Chapter 18 Politics in Time of Peril--1940 423
  • Chapter 19 Road to War 454
  • Chapter 20 Political Opponent in Time of War 480
  • Chapter 21 the Postwar World 513
  • Chapter 22 Ten Years Down on the Farm 542
  • Chapter 23 Elder Statesman 560
  • Bibliographical Note 583
  • Achnowledgments 586
  • Index 589
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