All the Year Round: A Nature Reader - Vol. 2

By Frances L. Strong | Go to book overview

he found that they put in large white lumps of something which came packed in barrels. The man gave him a large piece to take to school.

In the other house they were plastering the walls, and laying marble hearths in the fireplaces. The men gave him a small piece of the marble, and some plaster on a shingle.

Anna brought a dead starfish and a sea-urchin's house.

Mary's father was a doctor. She had heard him say that a baby had very soft bones and that an old person's were hard. Mary remembered how the snail's house was hardened, and she wondered if the lime in the water we drink could make bones hard.

Now was Mary's chance to test a bone, so she brought all of them that she could find.

Grace laid on the desk, a piece of chalk, a quartz crystal, and a carnelian.

That morning Miss Allen said, "I am glad you have brought so many things for us to test. This bottle is filled with acid. There are so many acids, I will give you the name of the one we use to test our stones.

"It is called muriatic acid. That is a pretty big word for children, but it is well to be able to call things by their right names.

-14-

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All the Year Round: A Nature Reader - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Note to the Teacher. iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Winter. 1
  • Winter. 3
  • 2. the Coral. 5
  • 3. the Coral Reefs 7
  • 4. What Becomes of the Shells. 9
  • The Fossils. 11
  • 6. Testing to Find Lime. 13
  • 7. Quartz. 17
  • 8. How the Sand Became Sandstone. 19
  • 9. a Story About Glass. 21
  • 10- the Travels of the King's Window Panes. 23
  • 11: The Starfish. 25
  • 12. the Sea-Urchin. 27
  • 13. the Oyster. 30
  • 14. the Sponge. 33
  • 15. the Coal Forests. 35
  • 16. Coal Mining. 38
  • 17. the Evergreens. 42
  • 18. the Pines. 44
  • 19. the Discontented Pine. 46
  • 20. the Fir Tree. 50
  • 21. the Little Fir Trees. 56
  • 22. the Eskimo. 59
  • 23. the Eskimo. 64
  • 24. the Seal 67
  • 25. Hunting Seals. 69
  • 26. Hassan. 71
  • 27. the Camel. 74
  • 28: The Palms 76
  • 29. the Palm Tree. 79
  • 30. Black Hawk. 81
  • 31. Hiawatha's Childhood. 84
  • 32. Hiawatha's First Deer. 86
  • 33. Vapor. 88
  • 34. Clouds. 91
  • 35. Rain. 93
  • 36. Dew. 94
  • 37. Frost Pictures. 96
  • 38. Little Jack Frost. 98
  • 39. the Little White Fairies. 100
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