The Influence of Monarchs: Steps in a New Science of History

By Frederick Adams Woods | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
CASTILE

MODERN Christian Spain, like France, took a modest beginning. In and about the northern mountains of the Peninsula, in rugged fastnesses, or inaccessible valleys, a few unconquered tribes lived on during the centuries of Moslem domination. From these narrow territories developed the independent kingdoms of Leon, Castile, Navarre, Aragon, and the province of Catalonia, which, sometimes in part uniting and often again separating, finally coalesced in the early part of the sixteenth century into the grand Spanish monarchy of world-wide influence. The early history of these separate kingdoms is very complicated. Genealogical accidents, or family feuds, often brought two or more regions under the rule of one king, only to be parcelled out again to his several heirs, as was the custom among Germanic peoples, and the royal families were Northerners in origin.

It is best for the purposes of the present analysis to confine ourselves to tracing first the growth of Castile and then of Aragon, for most of the remaining territory was soon united to one or other of these crowns. Navarre played a part of little importance, and was for a time under the administration of the kings of France.

It is difficult to know just where to begin an analysis of early Spanish history. Facts come but slowly out of the mists of obscurity and romance, and, moreover, there is said to have been a tendency on the part of the early chroniclers to distort the truth, to exaggerate the prowess and virtues of their greater rulers, and at the same time to indulge in

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Influence of Monarchs: Steps in a New Science of History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 438

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.