Studies in the Bible and Jewish Thought

By Moshe Greenberg | Go to book overview

Bible Interpretation as Exhibited in the First Book of Maimonides' Code 1989

In the cultural tradition of the West the Jews are the oldest extant example of a people constituted throughout most of its history by allegiance to a written document -- the Torah (in its larger sense, all of Hebrew Scripture and its authorized interpretation). The canonical Scripture defined Israel, prescribed its norms of conduct, and described its place in the past and future of mankind. Two factors made the Torah effective in society: (1) its popular base -- rudimentary means of mass education prescribed in the Torah had been elaborated by the start of the Christian era; and (2) a vigorous growing body of exegesis, as old as the canon, that assured its constant adjustment to contemporary needs.

Both factors are exemplified in the great digest of Jewish law and theology composed by Maimonides ( 1135-1204) for popular edification, the Mishneh Torah (English: the Code). This work sums up the beliefs and practices of Judaism topically, in categorical nonargumentative form, as they may be gathered from Talmudic-midrashic-gaonic (= post-Talmudic legal) literature. But it also incorporates a large amount of Bible interpretation, in the guise of proof-texts, most of them taken from the sources, but some (especially on theological matters) original with Maimonides. By noting the gap between the meaning of the proof-text in its primary scriptural context and its use in the Code, a hermeneutical operation is revealed, and by adding instance to instance one can survey the full range of hermeneutics at the disposal of classical Judaism in its maturity. This essay analyzes the use of proof-texts in Sefer ha-madda˓ ("The Book of Knowledge"), the first and most theological part of the Code.1

-421-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in the Bible and Jewish Thought
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 462

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.