War Book of the University of Wisconsin: Papers on the Causes and Issues of the War by Members of the Faculty

By Willard G. Bleyer; University of Wisconsin | Go to book overview

GERMANY'S WAR ON US IN TIME OF PEACE

By WILLIAM A. SCOTT Director of the Course in Commerce

Within the short period of three years, Germany transformed the United States from a friend and genuine admirer into an enemy at war. As evidence of our former friendship and admiration may be cited our high appreciation of her governmental, industrial and commercial efficiency, her attainments ill science and art, and her educational institutions; the large number of our students who attended her institutions of learning; the important place we gave in our schools to the teaching of the German language; our cordial and enthusiastic reception of her educational leaders in our colleges and universities; the sending of commissions and individual investigators to study her institutions and methods and report the results as a basis for domestic reforms; and our readiness to welcome and even to promote organizations which purported to have for their object the spread of German ideas, ideals and friendship.

Our transformation into an enemy at war was the result, among other things, of a gradual revelation of the facts, which we were very slow to comprehend, that Germany had not only not reciprocated, but had abused, our friendship, that she had always been hostile to our national ideas and policies, that for years she had been secretly plotting against us and attempting to thwart our purposes, and finally that she was actually committing almost daily acts of war against us.

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War Book of the University of Wisconsin: Papers on the Causes and Issues of the War by Members of the Faculty
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface 3
  • Contents 5
  • Introduction 11
  • Germany's Secret War Council, July 5, 1914 15
  • Germany's Ambition for World Power 30
  • Bibliography 43
  • Why Germany Wanted War 45
  • How Germany Explains Her Acts 61
  • Why Russia, France, and Britain Entered the War 75
  • Did Germany Wrong Belgium? 89
  • How Germany Makes War 101
  • What Frightfulness Means 119
  • Germany's War on Neutrals 131
  • How Germany Overthrew International Law 141
  • German Autocracy and Militarism 153
  • Our Right to Ship Munitions 180
  • Bibliography 192
  • Germany's War on Us in Time of Peace 193
  • German Submarines and the British Blockade 203
  • Bibliography 212
  • Germany's Gain from Germany's Defeat 213
  • Bibliography 224
  • Why Workingmen Support the War 225
  • If Germany Wins 241
  • The World Must Be Made Safe for Democracy 253
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