War Book of the University of Wisconsin: Papers on the Causes and Issues of the War by Members of the Faculty

By Willard G. Bleyer; University of Wisconsin | Go to book overview

IF GERMANY WINS

By WILLIAM H. KIEKHOFER Associate Professor of Economics

A German victory is not impossible unless we will to make it so. But to-day the fate of the world still hangs in the balance. The fifty-three million men that have already been called to the colors of the warring nations have not been able to decide it. If the war lasts long enough we shall win, for our allied nations have nearly eight times the population and more than four times the wealth of our enemies. But it will take time effectively to concentrate our overwhelming superiority in men and resources under the proper leadership.

Meanwhile we may well shudder to think of what would happen if the men of France and the British Empire, of Belgium and Italy and America, should fail to hold the western front stretching from the English Channel to the Adriatic Sea. Or if the farmers and miners failed to furnish increasing quantities of food and fuel. Or if Capital and Labor quarreled and we could not depend upon our industries to supply the necessary equipment, and above all the precious ships. Or if the morale of our peoples broke, and we failed to understand the issues at stake, and loyally to support every measure necessary for winning the war.

However flattering to our vanity, let us banish the delusion that the mere entrance of the United States into this war settled its outcome. Germany is not yet

-241-

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War Book of the University of Wisconsin: Papers on the Causes and Issues of the War by Members of the Faculty
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface 3
  • Contents 5
  • Introduction 11
  • Germany's Secret War Council, July 5, 1914 15
  • Germany's Ambition for World Power 30
  • Bibliography 43
  • Why Germany Wanted War 45
  • How Germany Explains Her Acts 61
  • Why Russia, France, and Britain Entered the War 75
  • Did Germany Wrong Belgium? 89
  • How Germany Makes War 101
  • What Frightfulness Means 119
  • Germany's War on Neutrals 131
  • How Germany Overthrew International Law 141
  • German Autocracy and Militarism 153
  • Our Right to Ship Munitions 180
  • Bibliography 192
  • Germany's War on Us in Time of Peace 193
  • German Submarines and the British Blockade 203
  • Bibliography 212
  • Germany's Gain from Germany's Defeat 213
  • Bibliography 224
  • Why Workingmen Support the War 225
  • If Germany Wins 241
  • The World Must Be Made Safe for Democracy 253
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