The Little Grandmother of the Russian Revolution: Reminiscences and Letters of Catherine Breshkovsky

By Ekaterina Konstantinovna Breshko-Breshkovskaeiia; Alice Stone Blackwell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X

MADAME BRESHKOVSKY found an especially sympathetic welcome in the social settlements. She stayed for some time at the Nurses' Settlement at 265 Henry Street, New York, at Denison House in Boston, and at Hull House in Chicago, and at each she left behind her a circle of strong friends. Miss Helena S. Dudley, who was then at the head of Denison House, said that no six years of her life had been worth so much to her as the six weeks that Madame Breshkovsky spent under her roof. Miss Lillian D. Wald, Jane Addams, Miss Ellen Starr, Professor Robert Erskine Ely, Arthur Bullard, and Kellogg Durland were among those who became warm and lasting friends.

She met Mrs. Julia Ward Howe, and the two noble old ladies took to each other at once. She called Mrs. Howe "une vraie citoyenne." Mrs. Howe invited Madame Breshkovsky to her home to lunch, and by way of welcome, sat down to the piano and struck up the Russian National Anthem. Madame Breshkovsky put her hands to her ears, with a cry. She explained to her astonished hostess that that tune was always played in honor of the Czar, and that the revolutionists held it in horror.

Emma Goldman did her utmost to help Madame

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The Little Grandmother of the Russian Revolution: Reminiscences and Letters of Catherine Breshkovsky
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 27
  • Chapter IV 41
  • Chapter V 59
  • Chapter VI 76
  • Chapter VII 89
  • Chapter VIII 103
  • Chapter IX 111
  • Chapter X 123
  • Chapter XI 133
  • Chapter XII 148
  • Chapter XIII 178
  • Chapter XIV - George Lazareff to Miss Blackwell. December 20, 1911. 213
  • Chapter XV 236
  • Chapter XVI 276
  • Chapter XVII 310
  • Appendix 331
  • Index 339
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