The Little Grandmother of the Russian Revolution: Reminiscences and Letters of Catherine Breshkovsky

By Ekaterina Konstantinovna Breshko-Breshkovskaeiia; Alice Stone Blackwell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XV

George Lazareff to Mrs. Barrows. November 8, 1912.
"After the peaceful strike at the Lena gold mines, more than eight hundred men, women and children were shot, killed and wounded, and all the political exiles, many of whom were working there, were expelled from the place. This trouble happened in the district of Kirensk."The police made two searches at Madame Breshkovsky's. They took away all her papers, postcards, and photographs, but later returned them. She is practically imprisoned in Kirensk. Meanwhile she is doing incessantly a great work in her immense district in organizing help for the starving exiles, and through them medical and other assistance for the local population. The whole population love her, and this again excites fresh suspicion on the part of the police. I send her regularly forty rubles a month" (a little more than twenty dollars).With three picture postcards sent to Miss Dudley.
"This is a typical Russian student. She comes from a far-off province, lives on eight or ten dollars per month, and is studying day and night, till she grows as lean as a dying woman. She wears these clothes

-236-

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The Little Grandmother of the Russian Revolution: Reminiscences and Letters of Catherine Breshkovsky
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 27
  • Chapter IV 41
  • Chapter V 59
  • Chapter VI 76
  • Chapter VII 89
  • Chapter VIII 103
  • Chapter IX 111
  • Chapter X 123
  • Chapter XI 133
  • Chapter XII 148
  • Chapter XIII 178
  • Chapter XIV - George Lazareff to Miss Blackwell. December 20, 1911. 213
  • Chapter XV 236
  • Chapter XVI 276
  • Chapter XVII 310
  • Appendix 331
  • Index 339
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