The South in the Building of the Nation

By J. A. C. Chandler; Franklin L. Riley et al. | Go to book overview

THE SOUTH IN THE BUILDING
OF THE NATION.

BIOGRAPHY.

JOHNSON, REVERDY, lawyer and statesman: b. in Maryland, 1796; died there in 1876. His father was chancellor of the Annapolis judicial district, and after graduating at St. John's College young Johnson studied law in his father's office and was admitted to the bar in 1815. Two years later he removed to Baltimore where he soon made a reputation as an able constitutional lawyer. In politics he was a whig and from 1821-1825 he was in the state senate. With Thomas Harris he reported the decisions of the Maryland court of appeals from 1820 to 1827, after which time he confined his practice mainly to cases before the United States Supreme Court. His fame as a lawyer spread and he was called even to England to argue a case before an international tribunal. In 1845 he was elected to the United States senate but resigned in 1849 to become President Taylor's attorney-general. After Taylor's death he returned to the practice of law in Baltimore, but retained an active interest in politics. Johnson was never a strict party man, and on several occasions he refused to bow to party dictation. He supported the policy that resulted in the Mexican War and thus went contrary to the Whig policy. In 1856 he with many other Whigs denounced the American or Know-Nothing movement and joined the Democrats. In 1860 Johnson was a Douglas Democrat and in 1861 was a member of the Peace Congress that endeavored to avoid war. From 1863 to 1868 he was in the United States senate.

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The South in the Building of the Nation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Department of Biography v
  • Introduction to Volumes XI and Xii. vii
  • Biography. 1
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