The Pre-Eminent Victorian: A Study of Tennyson

By Joanna Richardson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
ENOCH ARDEN

A WHITE evening [noted Mrs Bradley on December 30th]. After dinner G. and I went alone to Farringford. A. T. read us his tragedy Sir Aylmer...He said as he read, from time to time, how incalculably difficult the story was to tell... he often stopped to point out how hard he had found such and such a piece -- how much work and thought it had cost him ... He asked me several times if I understood things or recognized allusions. 1. The red in the chesnut blossom. 2. The Maximum and Minimum of a star. 3. The tented hopfields in winter -- 'I pride myself on that observation,' he said, 'have you ever seen the hop poles piled up like tents in the bare fields in winter?' There were some exquisite descriptions of cottages covered with creepers, he pointed out one about the Traveller's joy -- the description of Edith with the babies is charming. The 5 pink beads on the little feet. Emily laughed and said 'I knew you would be charmed with that.' The parting of the lovers in the dark rainy night under the 'roaring pines' we asked for again ... His glorious noble profile as he sat in the high back chair reading was most striking. There are lines furrowed deeper and deeper from brow to chin. There is a look in his face like a brightly shining lamp -- like an inward fire consuming his life.

* * *

Tennyson's reading, like that of Dickens, was a dramatic event. He read the fiery passages in Maud'with a voice and vehemence which he alone could compass', while the softer passages, said Rossetti, 'made the tears run down his cheeks like rain'. The reading which moved him to fury and tears reverberated long after his organ voice had died away. 'One part,' wrote Lear, when he had heard Maud, 'is enough to make you

-140-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Pre-Eminent Victorian: A Study of Tennyson
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.