The Foundations of American Nationality

By Evarts Boutell Greene | Go to book overview
lines. Here, too, religion and education were closely associated; but the dissenting ministers took the place of the Anglican clergy; especially significant was the work of the Scotch and Irish Presbyterians. After the establishment of Princeton College its graduates took an active part in the education of the "new South," though their influence was not strongly felt until just before the Revolution. By that time Princeton was attracting a number of southern students, among them James Madison, who helped to frame the Virginia constitution of 1776 and the Federal Constitution of 1787.
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES

Fiske, Old Virginia, II, 162-400. Winsor, America, V, chs. IV-VI.

General accounts

Hart, Contemporaries, II, chs. V, VI, nos. 82, 83, 106. Burnaby, A. , Travels ( Pinkerton, Voyages, XIII). Quincy, J., Journal ( 1773) (Mass. Hist. Soc., Proceedings, XLIX).

Sources, general.

Bassett, J. S., Writings of Colonel William Byrd, Introduction. Meade, W., Old Churches, Ministers, and Families of Virginia. Stannard, M. N., Colonial Virginia. Ford, W. C., Washington, I, ch. VII. Rowland, K. M., George mason, I, chs. II, III. Tyler, L. G., Williamsburg. Beveridge, A. J., John Marshall, I, 19-60 (back-country conditions). Detailed study of political institutions by P. S. Flippin in Columbia Univ. Studies.

Virginia

Byrd Writings. Maury, A., Memoirs of a Huguenot Family. Fithian, P. V., Journal and Letters. Harrower, J., Diary ( Am. Hist. Review, VI, 65-107). Jones, H., Present State of Virginia ( 1724; partial reprint in Stedman and Hutchinson, Library of American Literature, II, 279-287). Spotswood, A., Official Letters (Virginia Hist. Soc., Collections, New Series, I, II).

Sources.

Mereness, Maryland as a Proprietary Province, especially pp. 437-459 and pt. I, chs. IV, V. Articles by Sioussat, in Johns Hopkins Studies, XXI, nos. VI, VII, XI, XII.

Maryland.

Ashe, S. A., North Carolina, chs. XIII-XX, XXIII, especially chs. XIX, XXIII. Channing, United States, II, ch. XII. McCrady, South Carolina, 1670-1719, especially chs. XXVIII-XXX; and

The Carolinas.

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