Values and Intentions: A Study in Value-Theory and Philosophy of Mind

By J. N. Findlay | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
DUTY AND MORAL VALUE

(I) THE NOTION OF 'OUGHT': HORTATORY AND MINATORY IMPERATIVES

We have so far sought to enumerate and deduce the various separate ends (and counter-ends) which, as interpersonally and suprapersonally attuned, we must tend to move towards (or away from): we have distinguished a number of ends constitutive of the common and the 'higher' welfare, a number of evils constitutive of what may be called 'classical injustice', and of values constitutive of its somewhat colourless contrary, classical justice, as well as the very colourful positive end called by us 'Platonic justice'. These ends may all very well be said to be limbs of the same body, or members of the same family, all expressive in different ways of the same basic nisus towards the impersonal. But if they are limbs of a body, or members of a family, we have not yet shown how they fit and function together, and on what principles, in the detail of practice, one of them is to take precedence over another. What is here the desideratum is a value-concept or set of value-concepts which is at once connective, contextual and preferential, which will somehow superimpose itself upon, and bring together in one outcome, a number of distinct points of value and disvalue, all attaching to some single, well worked out project, which will do so in an actual context which extends some way beyond the project judged, and which will do so in a context of other hypothetical projections, which might have been preferred to it, or to which it might have been preferred. The kind of concept we are seeking is the kind covered by such phrases as 'the worthwhile thing on the whole, in the concrete case', 'the best thing that could happen in the circumstances', 'the right choice in the circumstances', 'what ought to be or be done in the circumstances', etc. etc. It is because our valuations permit a drawing together to this sort of outcome, that they form an organized 'body' at all, a body being a structure in all which all parts work together to produce a single result, as when heart, lungs, legs, eyes, etc., help us to jump over an obstacle, scale a height, etc. etc.

-332-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Values and Intentions: A Study in Value-Theory and Philosophy of Mind
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 448

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.