National Leadership and Foreign Policy: A Case Study in the Mobilization of Public Support

By James N. Rosenau | Go to book overview

lated by the Conference, but clearly a consensus did not mark their views about the effectiveness of the occasion or its utility as a consensus-building method.


TABLE 79 RESPONSES TO ITEM #59 (PER CENT)
What do you think is the best way to influence Congress in favor of any public issue?
**Mobilize general public opinion through a conference
of opinion leaders in Washington followed by a num-
ber of regional conferences
45
**Figure out key votes in Congress and get key constituents
to exert pressure
39
**There is no best way since the direction of Congressional
action depends on so many things
29
**I don't know 7
*Have constituents in general (not only key ones) exert
pressure on all members of Congress (not just key ones)
4
*Exert pressure on Congress through organizations, lobby-
ists, appearances before committees, or any other type
of organizational activity
2
*Generally mobilize public opinion (not necessarily through
a conference)
3
*Educate and inform the public by supplying it with facts
through any or all of the mass media
2
Other "ways" and uncodable comment 2
Question not answered3
Total (exceeds 100 per cent because not all the categories were mutually exclusive) 136
(n = 647)
*Category developed out of written responses.
**Provided alternative.

Summary

The data on post-Conference activity yielded four major findings. First, it seems plain that the conferees did not carry the word about foreign aid as far as they might have. Less than half of them fully utilized their access to the communications system during the three months subsequent to the Conference. Second, involvement was found to be the main background variable which determined the degree to which con

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