California, the Last Frontier

By Robert Durrenberger; G. Etzel Pearcy et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

ONE of the startling statistics of life today is that one out of every ten Americans lives in California. By 1985 more people will live there than were in the United States at the time of the Civil War. A continuation of present growth trends would mean that sometime in the next century half of the nation's population would reside in the state.

Most Californians have arrived on the scene in the last quarter of a century. Among them are included migrants from other states and other nations and, what used to be a rarity, the native-born Californian. Their impact on social and political institutions and on the landscape has been considerable. For Californians who have been observers of the changing scene over this span of time, the experience of watching their Garden of Eden slowly deteriorate has been a painful one. Their lovely orchards and oak-covered hills have been scarred by developers' bulldozers, their air has been polluted, and their river valleys have been lined with concrete. Cry California is not just the name of a journal; it expresses the feelings of those individuals who have resided in the state for a long time.

In this book I have looked at the major changes which have occurred in California in the recent past. I have also looked at certain symbols and events that have helped to build the picture that people in all parts of the world have of California. For this is a land of wonders wrought by God and by the hand of man; its fog-swept coastline, verdant forests, and mountain vistas have drawn myriad millions of visitors to the state. Disneyland is still the magic kingdom for old and young alike. It is a land apart; isolation is and has been a part of the story of California. Actual and economic isola-

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California, the Last Frontier
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface 3
  • Contents 5
  • 1 - California as a Distinct Region 7
  • 2 - Island California 20
  • 3 - Spanish California 32
  • 4 - The Golden State 43
  • 5 - One California -- or Many Californias? 59
  • 6 - Migrants and Migrations 77
  • 7 - Change and Growth 93
  • 8 - The California of Tomorrow 131
  • Study Guide 147
  • General References 153
  • Index 158
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