California, the Last Frontier

By Robert Durrenberger; G. Etzel Pearcy et al. | Go to book overview

7
Change and Growth

I speak to you as a citizen of California who was born and reared here and who by the grace of the voters of this state was for many years provided an opportunity to witness at close range, and in a thought-provoking way, many of the problems of growth of our great state.

When I was born here, the State of California had a population of about 1,000,000 people.I notice that it is now estimated to have close to 18,000,000 people. Great changes have taken place during the period of that growth. When I first knew the state, it was emerging from frontier days. Now it is a dynamic commonwealth of tremendous proportions in the life of our nation economically, culturally and politically. It is bound to play a much greater part, either for good or for evil, as that growth continues. It is still a great state and, in my opinion, is the greatest place on earth in which to live.

Now this is probably not an unprejudiced opinion. But I am sure that there are millions of people throughout the world who believe exactly as I do. If that were not true, 1,500 or so people every day, year in and year out, would not be coming to California to cast their lot with us. They come here seeking to establish a good life for themselves and their children. I believe that, working together, we can make that possible for many more millions of people than we have today, if we will but realize that cities are built for the happiness of people and that if happiness is to be achieved, we must know the needs of our people under drastically changing conditions.

We must do the things that are essential to make such happiness possible. We can no longer wait until severe problems become critical and then try to solve them by patching together partial solutions in the nature of a crazy quilt. We must consider the lives of our people as a whole. We must consider those lives in the aggregate, as a great responsibility of cities. Cities must be studied as a living organism

-93-

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California, the Last Frontier
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface 3
  • Contents 5
  • 1 - California as a Distinct Region 7
  • 2 - Island California 20
  • 3 - Spanish California 32
  • 4 - The Golden State 43
  • 5 - One California -- or Many Californias? 59
  • 6 - Migrants and Migrations 77
  • 7 - Change and Growth 93
  • 8 - The California of Tomorrow 131
  • Study Guide 147
  • General References 153
  • Index 158
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