Analytical Philosophy - Vol. 1

By R. J. Butler | Go to book overview

PREFACE

AN attempt has been made in this volume to present several strands of what is now known as analytical philosophy, but it would be misleading to suggest that all strands which flourish today in the English-speaking world are here represented. At the end of the Second World War two main streams were evident, the one associated with dispersed members of the Vienna Circle and the other with the later Wittgenstein. Within ten years the impact of Professor John Austin's approach was being felt on both sides of the Atlantic, to be followed in the present years by the reciprocal influence of those associated with Professor Zellig Harris. Cross-fertilization of methods and a general broadening of interests defeat the attempt to classify contemporary analytical philosophy into 'schools of thought'. These developments are surely salutary, the more so after a long period during which philosophers were concentrating upon sharpening their tools.

None of the papers in this volume has previously been published. I have seen fit to retain the logical notations adopted by the authors instead of enforcing a standard notation, either because other relevant literature is for the most part in the notation here used, or because a paper from the author's pen in any other notation would be unheard of.

The symposia led by Professors Vendler and Gasking and the paper by Professor Cartwright were delivered at a colloquium held within the Department of Philosophy at Oberlin College, Ohio, in April, 1961. I wish to thank President Robert K. Carr and Provost T. E. Manning for encouraging the calling of this colloquium and for making funds available, and my former colleagues for their co-operation. I also wish to thank the authors of the various papers for giving their consent to publish and for the encouragement which they have offered me, which in several cases included allowing me to read their unpublished writings.

R.J.B.

-vii-

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Analytical Philosophy - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Symposium - Effects, Results and Consequences 1
  • Causation - J. R. Lucas 32
  • Counterfactuals and Causal Laws 66
  • Propositions 81
  • On Some Paradoxes 104
  • Nonentities 120
  • Some Remarks About the Senses 133
  • Symposium - Avowals 154
  • Non-Other Minds 187
  • Dreaming and 'Depth Grammar' 211
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