Revolutionary Syndicalism and French Labor: a Cause without Rebels

By Peter N. Stearns | Go to book overview

Appendix B: Statistical Characteristics of Strikes and Their Evolution

The following figures are drawn from STAT; totals have been computed by the author for manufacturing and transport strikes alone.

TABLE I: NUMBER OF STRIKES AND STRIKERS PER YEAR
Industrial andIndustrial and
Yeartransport strikestransport strikers
1899 749 182,649
1900 808 225,364
1901 532 171,746
1902 558 209,214
1903 586 117,822
1904 892 206,888
1906 1,319 509,274
1907 1,131 201,105
1908 969 89,991
1909 1,060 184,592
1910 1,292 296,935
1911 1,281 205,172
1912 1,045 244,690
1913 965 215,759

-121-

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Revolutionary Syndicalism and French Labor: a Cause without Rebels
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Abbreviations of Commonly Cited References viii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Syndicalism: Its Development and Symptoms 9
  • 2 - The Moderation of French Workers 35
  • 3 - The Failure of Syndicalism 73
  • 4 - Conclusion 103
  • Appendices 109
  • Appendix A: Real Wages and Strikes 111
  • Appendix B: Statistical Characteristics of Strikes and Their Evolution 121
  • Notes 137
  • Bibliography 159
  • Index 165
  • About the Author *
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