The Changing Image of the City: Planning for Downtown Omaha, 1945-1973

By Janet R. Daly-Bednarek | Go to book overview

heavily on infrastructure improvements and on enhancing efficiency. Years of decline in traditional industries, together with the dawn of the service economy, gradually forced a redefinition of the city. The new service economy and the amenities-oriented middle class it created made demands far different from those expressed earlier; efficiency was no longer the key. By and large, the new service industries did not need better streets and sewers to do business. They sought a business environment that provided not just a favorable economic climate, but an exciting and vibrant living environment. The educated and mobile individuals involved in the service economy demanded cultural and recreational amenities; they wanted a sophisticated ambience as well as a congenial tax structure. The new attitudes prompted a redefinition of the city as a place in which to live, a place that provided the ambience and amenities now in demand. In that spirit, Omaha's planners and boosters responded in the late 1960s and reshaped its image to accommodate their perception of the changed attitudes.

Nationally, much of the planning and boosting activity of the postwar years focused on downtowns and waterfronts. At first, the assumption that a downtown would continue in its traditional role as the center of business, retail activity, and industry underlay planning proposals. Planners emphasized infrastructure improvements and face-lift projects to maintain the center-place status. They defined waterfronts largely in terms of their commercial value as highways for goods; cities used rivers flowing past them as convenient sewers. Gradually, as both the role of the downtown and the image of the city changed, proposals for downtowns began to reflect new ideas. Once planners accepted downtown's new role as an office, entertainment, and cultural center, they called for projects that would create the demanded cultural and recreational amenities and ambience sought by the new middle class. The image of the waterfront changed as it came to be valued as an environmental and recreational amenity. Such changes were evident in professional planning journals, in books and articles written by planning experts, and in the types of projects cities undertook.

City planning in Omaha between 1945 and 1973 endured a similar transformation. The issue became one of determining the relationship between changes in general planning theory and developments at the local level. The task would have been simple if new planning ideas merely suc-

-2-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Changing Image of the City: Planning for Downtown Omaha, 1945-1973
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • One - New Ideas and Changing Images 1
  • Two - The Changing City: Omaha, 1945-1973 41
  • Three - Setting the Agenda: Planning, 1933-1945 77
  • Conclusion 104
  • Four - Traditional Planning for a Traditional City, 1945-1958 107
  • Conclusion 147
  • Five - A City in Transition, 1958-1966 149
  • Six - A "New City," a New Image: Planning, 1966-1973 187
  • Conclusion 224
  • Epilogue 227
  • Notes 237
  • Bibliography 267
  • Index 277
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 296

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.