The Changing Image of the City: Planning for Downtown Omaha, 1945-1973

By Janet R. Daly-Bednarek | Go to book overview

campaign under the leadership of Russell J. Hopley, president of Northwestern Bell Telephone Company, in November 1943. The goal was to raise fifty thousand dollars over the next two years to support planning activity. Concurrently, the chamber sponsored a joint chamber--Omaha Planning Commission--City Improvement Council--civic group effort to develop a master plan. One member group, the City Improvement Council, briefly discussed bringing in an outside expert, but the idea was rejected as it decided to move forward without expert assistance. However, the chamber did receive an offer of free technical advice from the Omaha Engineers Club.61

During 1944 the chamber and Creighton University cosponsored a series of seminars on postwar planning. Creighton, a private Jesuit university, was on the northwest fringe of downtown Omaha. Because of its location and its desire to grow, Creighton became intensely interested in plans for the downtown and its fringe. The seminars were the beginning of the university's involvement with city planning and covered a broad range of topics, offering yet another opportunity for study and discussion.62

The reports, meetings, conferences, and resolutions of 1943 and 1944 served to fix the idea of planning firmly in the public mind. They were the preliminaries to appointment of the Mayor's City-Wide Planning Committee in 1945. It was the beginning of Omaha's initial large-scale postwar planning campaign.


Conclusion

The activities carried out between 1933 and 1945 taught civic and business leaders many important lessons. They gained valuable experience in dealing with governmental agencies and forged the first tentative links with a new partner, the federal government. They found innovative methods through which to advance their goals in the Carter Lake Development Society and the Dock Board. They were inspired to give considerable thought to deciding what it was their city needed in order to be modern and up to date, what it needed to continue to compete effectively with other cities. And they formulated ideas about their city that, while not fully integrated, were sufficiently developed to begin implementation when the opportunity presented itself.

-104-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Changing Image of the City: Planning for Downtown Omaha, 1945-1973
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • One - New Ideas and Changing Images 1
  • Two - The Changing City: Omaha, 1945-1973 41
  • Three - Setting the Agenda: Planning, 1933-1945 77
  • Conclusion 104
  • Four - Traditional Planning for a Traditional City, 1945-1958 107
  • Conclusion 147
  • Five - A City in Transition, 1958-1966 149
  • Six - A "New City," a New Image: Planning, 1966-1973 187
  • Conclusion 224
  • Epilogue 227
  • Notes 237
  • Bibliography 267
  • Index 277
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 296

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.