The Changing Image of the City: Planning for Downtown Omaha, 1945-1973

By Janet R. Daly-Bednarek | Go to book overview

FIVE
A City in Transition, 1958-1966

Part I: Continuity, 1958-1966

The years 1958 to 1966 marked a time when continuity with past planning practices and themes gradually gave way under the force of ever increasing change. Nonetheless, it did shape much of the planning activity during those years. The formal planning for the downtown and riverfront as outlined in the Central Omaha Plan of 1966 represented the continuing influence of older ideas about the city. Three programs that were introduced or had gained renewed popularity in the 1950s set planning priorities for the 1960s. The first of these, annexation, represented Omaha's major response to rapid growth in outlying areas. The second, an Interstate Highway System loop around the fringes of the city, with a direct connection to the downtown, promised to bond the newer areas with the central core. By affording easy access, planners hoped to reinforce the central role of the downtown. And in the third program, intended to shore up the city's center in its traditional role, public and private planners proposed to use urban renewal. In pursuing these priority programs, civic and business leaders faced two directions at once: decentralization and expansion, and the continued dominance of a traditional, viable downtown. They could pursue such seemingly contradictory courses because, as they saw it, they could have both.


ANNEXATION, THE INTERSTATE, AND URBAN RENEWAL: PRIORITIES FOR THE 1960S

The metropolitan-area concept adopted by the Chamber of Commerce in 1958 colored much of the planning activity from that point on. The

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The Changing Image of the City: Planning for Downtown Omaha, 1945-1973
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • One - New Ideas and Changing Images 1
  • Two - The Changing City: Omaha, 1945-1973 41
  • Three - Setting the Agenda: Planning, 1933-1945 77
  • Conclusion 104
  • Four - Traditional Planning for a Traditional City, 1945-1958 107
  • Conclusion 147
  • Five - A City in Transition, 1958-1966 149
  • Six - A "New City," a New Image: Planning, 1966-1973 187
  • Conclusion 224
  • Epilogue 227
  • Notes 237
  • Bibliography 267
  • Index 277
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