The Foundations of American Constitutionalism

By Andrew C. McLaughlin | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THE lectures here appearing in print were delivered at New York University in the spring of 1932 on the Anson G. Phelps Lectureship. The founder of this lectureship desired to provide for a course of public lectures "upon the early history of America, particularly with reference to New England, with the purpose of inculcating a knowledge of the principles which animated the Puritan Fathers and early colonists; and of the influence they have exerted upon modern civilization." This purpose I have attempted to carry out with directness and distinctness. It may seem to the reader -- if there be one -- that I have neglected to take into proper consideration many influences beside those of the Puritans; but such reflections will not be justified, I think, if the field and purpose of the lectureship be taken into account.

I have adhered in this volume to the lecture form of address and have not changed to the essay form. For this reason, and probably also because of my experiences in nearly half a century of teaching, I have allowed myself to indulge in emphasis and repetition, the common and useful devices of the class-room. My hope is that these characteristics will not be unwelcome in the printed page.

To what extent the contents of the volume are new and of value to the serious student of the period covered, it is impossible for me to say. I am inclined to think that the lectures have some novelty and usefulness because they bring out the relationship between political philosophy and constitutional achievement; and the very emphasis to which I have just referred may be valuable; it is customarily difficult for a reader or a student to find his way through a tangle of his-

-V-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Foundations of American Constitutionalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 176

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.