Organized Anti-Semitism in America: The Rise of Group Prejudice during the Decade 1930-40

By Donald S. Strong | Go to book overview

Amercan Council On Pulic Affairs

Dedicated to the belief that the extensive diffusion of information is a profound responsibility of American democracy, the American Council on Public Affairs is designed to promote the spread of authoritative facts and significant opinions concerning contemporary social and economic problems.

It endeavors to contribute to public knowledge through the publication of books, studies and pamphlets, encouragement of adult education, stimulation of interest in nonfiction materials, initiation of research projects, organization of lectures and forums, arrangement of radio broadcasts, issuance of timely press releases, compilation of opinions on vital issues, and cooperation with other organizations.

The Council believes that the facts presented and opinions expressed under its sponsorship deserve careful attention and consideration. It is not, however, committed to these facts and opinions in any other way. Those associated with the Council necessarily represent different viewpoints on public questions.

The members of the Council's National Board are Harry Elmer Barnes, Rev. John Haynes Holmes, Dr. George F. Zook, Prof. Robert S. Lynd, Paul Kellogg, Prof. Clyde Miller, Lowell Mellett, Rev. Henry Smith Leiper, Walter West, Prof. Edwin E. Witte, Willard Uphaus, Dr. Stephen P. Duggan, Elizabeth Christman, Dr. Frank P. Graham, Prof. Arthur E. Burns, John B. Andrews, Prof. Max Lerner, W. Jett Lauck, Chester Williams, Prof. Paul T. Homan, Dr. L. M. Birkhead, Prof. Ernest Griffith, Dr. Clark Foreman, Delbert Clark, Abraham Epstein, Dr. Bruce Melvin, E. C. Lindeman, Clarence Pickett, Prof. Hadley Cantril, Dr. Floyd W. Reeves, Clark M. Eichelberger, Dr. Frederick L. Redefer, Carl Milam, E. J. Coil, Dr. Frank Kingdon, Rev. Guy Shipler, Prof. Mark May, Dean Charles W. Pipkin, Prof. Frederic A. Ogg, and Dr. Esther C. Brunauer. M. B. Schnapper is Executive Secretary and Editor of Publications

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