Organized Anti-Semitism in America: The Rise of Group Prejudice during the Decade 1930-40

By Donald S. Strong | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

By CLYDE R. MILLER*

When Adolph Hitler set out to become dictator of Germany and then of Europe, and finally, of the world, he began with a definite propaganda plan. This had for its immediate purpose the unification of Germany, and the disorganization of the Western democracies. This he accomplished by skillful utilization of psychological processes and propaganda techniques.

He appealed primarily to the processes of frustration, displacement, and anxiety. The Germans were frustrated -- the natural result of a series of disasters: loss of the war; inflation; and then, the impact of devastating depression. To the astute propagandist frustrated people are made to order. Hitler, the most astute propagandist of modern times, gave the German people new goals for which they could pitch in and work -- goals which to them seemed to provide a way out of their troubles. He set before them hopes and aspirations, in the seeking of which they could canalize their frustration in terms of aggressive action. Shrewdly, to the masses, he gave an outlet for their aggressiveness: destroy the Jews.

By the psychological process of displacement the Germans were eager to shift the blame for defeat, inflation, and depression upon some scapegoat. Historically, the Jews provided it. For many centuries they had been an "outside group," different from the great majority group of Christian Germans. It is in the nature of man to fear and suspect groups whose practices and rituals differ from their own. The Christian churches had done little to break down the basis for such fear and suspicion. Thus, Hitler found at his disposal in the small minority Jewish group a scapegoat which could be blamed for all of Germany's troubles. A small Catholic group, a small Masonic group, a small group of capitalists or bankers -- psychologiaelly, any such group would have answered the same purpose. Indeed, Hitler made use of these other minority groups as scapegoats, but he achieved mass hatred most effectively by thus utilizing the Jewish minority. Centuries of "conditioning" made that end more easily obtainable, plus the fact that the Jews in Germany were such a small minority.

To win the "upper classes" and the dwindling middle class, Hitler found another scapegoat: the Communists. It is quite beside the point to say that in the original platform of the Nazi Party he included many

____________________
*
Associate Professor of Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, and Secretary of the Institute for Propaganda Analysis.

-i-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Organized Anti-Semitism in America: The Rise of Group Prejudice during the Decade 1930-40
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 191

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.