Organized Anti-Semitism in America: The Rise of Group Prejudice during the Decade 1930-40

By Donald S. Strong | Go to book overview

Preface

SEVERAL years ago I became intensely interested in the operations of anti-semitic organizations in the United States. Fortunately, my research duties at the University of Chicago, together with the excellent opportunities available in that city for first-hand scrutiny of anti-semitism, made it possible for me to give the matter a considerable amount of attention.

I should emphasize that my concern with the subject is based upon a profound belief in the capacity of democratic America to cope with its enemies and counter-currents and that I have striven for complete objectivity in presenting the facts here assembled. My personal origins cannot, of course, be considered an influence in choosing or developing the theme in question. In this connection I wish to add that the unbiased interest of the American Council on Public Affairs has been both encouraging and helpful.

My chief guide and critic has been Dr. Harold D. Lasswell, formerly of the University of Chicago and now associated with the William Alanson White Psychiatric Foundation of Washington, D. C. For penetrating criticism I am indebted to Dr. Harold F. Gosnell of the University of Chicago and Lewis E. Gleeck, now with the American Consular Service in Canada.

I followed the standard practice among scholars and exploited my wife for help in typing, revising, and other tedious jobs. She was most helpful in encouraging me to dispense, whenever possible, with ponderous academic jargon and to express my ideas in simpler terms.

DONALD S. STRONG

Department of Government The University of Texas Austin, Texas

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