Organized Anti-Semitism in America: The Rise of Group Prejudice during the Decade 1930-40

By Donald S. Strong | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
The Edmondson Economic Service

TO REFER to the Edmondson Economic Service as an "organization" is definitely to stretch the meaning of the term. Robert Edward Edmondson, the head of this center of anti-semitic propaganda, has no organizational inclinations. He is primarily important as an energetic free-lance writer and distributor of anti-semitic literature.


LEADERSHIP

Something of Edmondson's highly interesting background can be gleaned from the autobiographical sketch he published in the January 28, 1936, issue of his weekly publication:

Robert Edward Edmondson was born in Dayton, Ohio, in 1872, son of Edward Edmondson, artist. My business career includes nearly forty years in journalism as reporter, editor, publisher, financial writer and investment economist from coast to coast. Politically, I am nonpartisan, pro-Constitution, pro-National, anti-International and antiCommunist; not a member of any secret society. Financially, modestly independent, with no entangling alliances. Religion, not a churchman but a believer in Christian principles. Ancestry, native American, chiefly Scotch descent, pre-Revolution, from Maryland.

I began in Cincinnati, Ohio, as reporter and then sub-editor for the Cincinnati Post, later representative for the Scripps-McRae Press Association. Was news correspondent in New York City for the Louisville Times, Milwaukee Journal, Minneapolis Journal, and twenty other western newspapers. Sub-editor on James Gordon Bennett's New York Herald, following reportorial service on New York Mail and Express under Editor Stoddard. Economic writer for the Fairchild Publications. Financial editor for the New York Journal. For a few months I was on the staff of financial news reporters employed by the manager of the Daily Financial News Bureau of the now defunct Town Topics Weekly, once run by Jewish scandalmongers. J. A. Joseph was chosen to operate the bureau.

I regard my short connection with this agency in the New York financial district as the most valuable of my entire financial experience because it provided knowledge which enabled me to identify positively the sinister Jewish Leadership forces which were then subverting American finance through economic power, and who later similarly prostituted politics. The knowledge gained during this association was what determined me when I established on a capital of £300 thirty-three years ago my own independent and unsubsidized financial news analytical Edmondson Service. . . .

-79-

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