Organized Anti-Semitism in America: The Rise of Group Prejudice during the Decade 1930-40

By Donald S. Strong | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
The American Vigilant Intelligence Federation

THE American Vigilant Intelligence Federation was incorporated under the laws of Illinois as a non-profit corporation in December, 1927. From that date until April, 1933, it was not a membership organization. It consisted only of a general manager, his secretary, a few solicitors and undercover men, and some very extensive files on persons and organizations considered subversive by the Federation. The files were the organization's chief basis of income, for from them came the information for which businessmen and others paid substantial fees. In April, 1933, the Federation became a membership organization. The high point of activity was reached in the spring and summer of 1934. At that time, meetings of the Federation's Inner Circle in Chicago were held regularly and ambitious national plans were laid. Some organizational work was carried on in certain parts of Michigan. After the McCormack Committee investigated the Federation in August, 1934, it became less conspicuous. During the 1936 Presidential campaign, however, the organization threw off some of its old secrecy, conducted public meetings, and de-emphasized spying on the "Reds." Since 1936, it has avoided public attention although it has remained quite active.

The Federation's present objects and purposes, as set forth in the literature sent to prospective members, are:

To combat and counteract the insidious work of anti-American propagandists, including those who have invaded American shores in order to belittle the patriotic efforts of American heroes and to tarnish their fair name.

To combat and counteract the efforts of anti-American organizations which are expending huge sums to destroy American institutions and to create a Socialistic or Communistic World Government.

To combat and counteract the rule of insidious minorities, bureaucracies, and lawless elements.

To refrain from being a party to any religious, political or racial controversy unless such controversy contains a political element that is inimical to American Liberty and American Civilization.

To consummate its educational program by the means of patriotic

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Organized Anti-Semitism in America: The Rise of Group Prejudice during the Decade 1930-40
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 191

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.