Organized Anti-Semitism in America: The Rise of Group Prejudice during the Decade 1930-40

By Donald S. Strong | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
The Paul Reveres
THE distinction between an organization that is anti-revolutionary and anti-semitic and one that is merely anti-revolutionary is not always easy to draw. The groups considered so far are openly and frankly anti-semitic; and they do not care who knows it. Among the scores of American organizations that are termed only as anti-revolutionary, however, a few are covertly anti-semitic. Often the leader is anti-semitic while the rank and file is not and, moreover, is unaware of its leader's prejudice. Such a group is The Paul Reveres. It is analyzed not because it is an important group, but because it is typical of several organizations that border on anti-semitism.
LEADERSHIP
Mrs. Albert W. Dilling, famed among red-baiters as the author of the Red Network, was the real founder of The Paul Reveres. The organization dates back to early 1931, when Mrs. Dilling first discussed with Colonel Edwin Marshall Hadley the formation of some sort of anti-Communism club. Nothing concrete was done, however, until October 17, 1932. On that date, Colonel Hadley and Kenneth E. Shephard called, by appointment, at Mrs. Dilling's home in Kenilworth (suburban Chicago) for the purpose of putting her idea into effect. Mrs. Dilling suggested the name -- The Paul Reveres. Hadley formulated the purposes of the organization:
To promote patriotism
To advance Americanism
To combat radicalism.

On November 21, 1932, the group obtained a certificate of incorporation. Headquarters were then set up at 120 South La Salle Street, Chicago. Shortly thereafter, Mrs. Dilling resigned because, accord. ing to her admission, Colonel Hadley, the president, had become antisemitic. An active membership existed until 1935, but from then until early 1937 it was merely Colonel Hadley. Subsequently the name of The Paul Reveres disappeared from the door of the La Salle Street office, and the organization passed quietly into limbo. Though The Paul Reveres had several other elected officers and a national

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